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Wednesday, 27 June 2012

The Queen's visit

I'll admit I have been sleeping on the job here because this crept up on me while I was dealing with unemployment woes, (yes that means I am out of university and not a law job in sight, ah well, maybe the meat packing plant needs another worker?), but the Queen's visit to Northern Ireland, in short, has been positively received. Mc Guinness being the Sinn Fein representitive that shakes Her Majesty's hands shouldn't surprise anyone, we all know what Gerry is like. However I am going to have to draw a different bead on the situation then the good fellow on MadMonarchist who is interpreting this as a 'victory' for United Kingdom Royalism. I normally don't disagree with the man but I honestly think he is horribly mistaken in his exuberence.

On the parts he is correct about is that yes this does represent that the anger and hatred of years passed has simmered down to the point where this is possible, but his appraisal of why even Roman Catholic Nationalists in the North are accepting the status quo is woefully misaimed.

In truth, it is no secret Dublin wants nothing to do with the North, everybody knows that, in fact that's one of the primary reasons I direct alot of bile towards the southern government, (oh yeah, and the confessional seal law, looking up to Uncle Mao are you an Tainiste?), but the reason northern nationalists arent keen on dissolving partition nowadays is because they do not want to be taxed into the ground like our southern Brothers and sisters are. My own mother, who's about as republican as you can get said she would vote against reintegration precisely along those economic lines. So in reference to the mad one's post, it is not so much that the Crown 'won' as much as Leinster House 'lost' because of economic realities, (well that and the NHS, mother is surprisingly keen on the institution despite its horrendous flaws). Its a sad state of affairs when economics override principles, but hey, that is literally the story of the 21st century so far, so we aren't too out of place.

Why I am so calm and couldn't give two rats behinds about the furore Anglophilic Royalists and Irish Republicans alike are throwing up over this whole ordeal is because I acknowledge the inevitable reality of Northern Ireland: Whether anyone likes it or not the North will be integrated into a United Ireland sooner or later. Its a demographic inevitability, as well as that, when it comes down to it, London wants the North even less then Dublin does and I don't believe for a moment, except for a few Imperial holdouts in the rest of the UK, that Britain wont have a referendum held for reintegration of Northern Ireland into the south as soon as it is demographically feasible, I dare you to look at the constitutional set up of Northern Ireland and tell me this is not the case. This is why in all my other posts dealing with speculation for a Irish High Kingdom pre-supposes unification and I allude to the 'unionist problem' which is something a future United Ireland will be left with in the wake of this, (Because the Unionists won't be going anywhere after all, their roots are already planted in the North).

Anyway, sorry for the lack of updates, now its back to figuring out how to be of use to society I go.

Slan go Phoile

11 comments:

  1. From what I understand (keeping in mind I got this rom Wikipedia), 4 of the 6 counties have a nationalist majority.
    Personally I think working up a friendship with Britain is good. We should learn to forgive them at some point, but never forget. There is a difference, and Irish people should not feel the need to ever forget what happened out of embarrassment. We were the ones who were persecuted - let us remember that.

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    1. Four of the counties may have a nationalist majority, but the absolute majority overall still lies in the Unionist favour.

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    2. Wrong 4 counties in Northern Ireland have a catholic majority , not all Catholics are nationalists far from it , I would say all six counties still favour the union.

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  2. Where do you get your statistics from Servent? I usually just use wikipedia, but people like to say it's not very credible as a source.

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    1. Census as well as ongoing trends. Living on the ground in Northern Ireland it is easy to get the lay of the land here. Catholicism is the largest single Church in the North, but protestantism in general is larger. Getting exact numbers of nationalists and unionists is a nightmare however and is not wise to base on the size of religion in the region. What with Catholic Unionists and Protestant nationalists muddying the waters.

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  3. Re-unification will happen. It won't be a glorious affair, I'm sure. But I don't believe it will be a violent and messy event, either. And that's something to be grateful for.

    I'd agree with Antaine on the desirability of fostering good relations with the other island. However, I'd do it in such a way as emphasises the differences between the different nations of Britain. We ought to cultivate the deepest ties with Scotland, the nation closest to our own in culture, language and history. We ought to encourage as much as possible its move to independence from England, and follow the achievement of this with moves to establish greater military and economic integration between both countries. At the very least, this would provide an outlet for the energies of those many unionists who look to Scotland as both a spiritual and literal motherland.

    Naturally, this will not make England happy, but if we can frame it as a process that presents no threat - and even secures England's safety in the northwest approaches to these isles - it should be possible. Relations with Wales can be cultivated as a peaceful cultural buffer zone between ourselves and England. Finally, we should never fear expressions of admiration for traditional English culture and values, and work to safeguard understanding and trade between our nation and that nation which properly resides east of the Severn.

    I wish you well in your job hunt, Servent. I'm sure it'll all pan out for the best.

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  4. Heads up Servent. Did you hear about what the Irish Catholic was reporting? Supposedly the Church plans on having "priestless parishes" which lay people might lead (!) Mind telling Sir Knight for me? I can't post there anymore.

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    1. That is one hell of a report, any links or such I can pass on to the knight?

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    2. Wait nevermind just got the story myself. Apparently the bishops are only contemplating allowing lay services and not lay masses. But I'll pass it along.

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    3. Thanks Servent
      I have to be honest - without being too dramatic - but it's a bit worrying. As long as it doesn't turn into "priestless masses" I suppose it won't be too bad - if it comes to priestless anything, that is.

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    4. Unfortunately, here in the United Socialist States of America (Sorry if I sound embittered!) Lay led "communion services" are a constant threat; with all-too-eager old ladies just waiting for any excuse to play "priestess" and manhandle the Blessed Sacrament. "We don't need a priest, we can celebrate Eucharist ourselves!" (Maybe that's why they won't use the word "Mass" anymore.)

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